UTC students are more confident of getting a job compared to those at other schools

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UTC students are more confident of getting a job compared to those at other schools

Students at University Technical Colleges (UTCs), like Bucks UTC on Oxford Road, Aylesbury, are more confident of getting a job (88%) when they finish education than those at other mainstream schools (75%). The findings are taken from two surveys of 14-18 year old students from both UTCs and other schools published today by the Baker Dearing Educational Trust.

Today’s surveys also show students at UTCs are more confident of being ‘job ready’ when they do enter the workplace. 88% of students said they felt confident of being job ready compared to 67% of students at other mainstream schools.

More than twice as many UTC students feel they have gained business know- how compared to their mainstream school counterparts. The survey also shows that almost 70% of students at UTCs believe they have gained valuable practical skills compared to less than half of students from other schools.

Findings in the South East

77% of students at mainstream schools are confident of getting a job when they leave education
86% of students at technical colleges are confident of getting a job when they leave education
78% of students at mainstream schools are confident of getting a job that suits their skill set
93% of students at technical colleges are confident of getting a job that suits their skill set
11% of students at mainstream schools plan on doing an apprenticeship when they leave school
30% of students at technical colleges plan on doing an apprenticeship when they leave school
Of those that know what career they want to do, 40% of students at university technical colleges want to pursue a career in engineering compared to 10% of students at mainstream schools

Lord Baker, chair of Baker Dearing Educational Trust, the charity behind UTCs, said:

“It is essential that young people have a good understanding of business and are well prepared to join the world of work. These surveys highlight that students at UTCs gain an education that gives them greater confidence and skills that employers value. Developing and nurturing an ambitious future workforce will directly contribute to the success of our economy. University Technical Colleges are playing an important role in helping to train the next generation of highly skilled technicians, scientists and engineers.”

Philip Greenish CBE, Chief Executive of the Royal Academy of Engineering, said:

“The UK needs many more people with skills in innovation, creativity and enterprise – skills that are fundamental to engineering and key to the UK’s competitive edge. University Technical Colleges are superbly positioned to reach out to young people from all backgrounds, male and female, and to bring to life the wonderful opportunities available from a career in engineering.”

Bev Flanagan, Principal of Bucks UTC, said:

“We’re delighted that students at Bucks UTC feel their learning is relevant and that this gives them a confidence boost as they enter the world of work. We have superb links with major local employers and our students are already being recognised and offer fantastic work placements with them. This is exactly what UTCs are all about – opening up opportunities and ensuring our young people are work-ready.”

Other findings

Students at UTCs are more confident of getting a job that reflects their skills (92% v 77% ) and crucially securing a job that they will enjoy (87% v 77%).

The surveys highlight a significan’t difference in girls’ attitudes to careers in engineering. Girls in other schools think boys have a much better chance of getting jobs in engineering with just 43% saying they have the same opportunities in the industry. As a result, only 3% would consider a career in engineering. The good news is that nearly two thirds (65%) of girls who attend (UTCs) believe they have the same job chances as boys.

While half of students at mainstream schools plan on going to university, only one in ten will be doing an apprenticeship; at UTCs, around three times as many intend to pursue an apprenticeship.

In terms of work ambitions students from UTCs rated engineering, IT and digital as the careers they are most likely to pursue after education, skills in great demand by employers. In comparison, most students at other schools said careers in arts and culture and healthcare were what they were aiming for.

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